Monday, January 10, 2011

Pattern Weight Tutorial

The other day I was in search of pattern weights, as I had been hearing how much easier they were for tracing and cutting patterns, rather than pinning.  I found these wonderful weights at the fabric store.
Photo Credit
4 nicely covered weights for...$10!!!  Ummmm.....no thank you.  I can buy a yard or two of fabric for that price.  So I left empty handed, with a mission to make my own weights.

So here is my version of  pretty pattern weights.  You'll need:
-Mod Podge
-Hex Nuts (mine are 3/4") I got a bag of 10 for less than $2
-Brush
-Scrap fabric
-A small cap (I started with a pop bottle cap, but it was a bit large so I rummaged through my spice cabinet and ended up using the cap from my Almond Extract bottle).
-Polyester fiberfill stuffing
-Scissors, pen, etc.


Step 1: Use your cap to trace 2 circles for each hex nut, onto your fabric and cut out.  Lay those aside.


Step 2: Cut a strip of fabric about 1.75" x 5".  This size worked well for the hardware I was using.  Adjust your measurements if you're using a different sized nut or washer.


Step 3: Now get ready to get sticky.  Open up your Mod Podge and using the paintbrush spread it on the wrong side of the fabric.  Use it generously. And don't be shy about slopping it around abit.  You'll be putting Mod Podge on the outside of your fabric later anyways.


Step 4: Roll up the hex nut along the flat sides.


Step 5: When you get to the end of the strip of fabric, fold over about 1/4" to tuck under the raw edge.  Dab on a little more Mod Podge to glue that end down.


Step 6:  Once you've rolled the fabric around the nut, it should look like this, with a about a half inch (give or take) of fabric left on each side.


Step 7: Tuck the edges of the fabric into the center of the hex nut.  You'll find that it doesn't want to stick very well to the inside of the hex nut at first.  As it's drying, and everything is getting tacky, you can reach in and push in back down then.


Step 8:  Wait patiently for it dry for a good half hour or so.  Then take a small amount of Poly-fill and stuff into the center of the hex nut.

 Step 9: Take your small circle cut-outs and use the Mod Podge to glue one to each end of the hex nut, covering the poly-fill you just stuffed inside.  You'll have to do one end and wait until it's good and dry before you flip it over to do the other end.  Be sure to cover the whole fabric covered hex nut with Mod Podge afterwards, to give it a nice seal.

Ta Da! You have some fabulously pretty, cheap and useful pattern weights.